Glass

Laminated Safety Glass

 

Laminated glass is a type of safety glass that holds together when shattered. In the event of breaking, it is held in place by an interlayer, between its two or more layers of glass. The interlayer keeps the layers of glass bonded even when broken, and its high strength prevents the glass from breaking up into large sharp pieces. This produces a characteristic “spider web” cracking pattern when the impact is not enough to completely pierce the glass.

Laminated glass is normally used when there is a possibility of human impact or where the glass could fall if shattered and also for architectural applications. Skylight glazing and automobile windshields typically use laminated glass.

Laminated glass is also used to increase the sound insulation rating of a window, where it significantly improves sound attenuation compared to un laminated glass panes of the same thickness.

 

Insulated Glass

Insulated Glass more commonly known as double glazing (or double-pane, and increasingly triple glazing/pane), consists of two or three glass window panes separated by a vacuum or gas filled space to reduce heat transfer across a part of the building envelope.

Insulated glass units (IGUs) are manufactured with glass in range of thickness from 3 to 10 mm (1/8″ to 3/8″) or more in special applications. Laminated or tempered glass may also be used as part of the construction. Most units are produced with the same thickness of glass used on both panes